The Warrior-Scholar Project

Each issue, the editorial staff of Military Embedded Systems will highlight a different charitable organization that benefits the military, veterans, and their families. We are honored to cover the technology that protects those who protect us every day. To back that up, our parent company – OpenSystems Media – will make a donation to every group we showcase on this page.

This issue we are highlighting the Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that was originally founded by Yale University classmates Chris Howell, Jesse Reising, and Nick Rugoff with the aim of ensuring excellence in educational opportunities for exiting U.S. enlisted service personnel.

To that end, the program seeks to provide a way forward academically for enlisted military veterans following their transition out of service by building a skill bridge from enlisted service to a top-tier academic curriculum; helping to build the academic confidence level of each participant; and ensuring that participants leave the program with a better understanding of the higher-education landscape and what gaining admission to a top college entails.

The WSP runs highly intensive, totally immersive, one- and two-week college-preparatory academic boot camps hosted at America’s top colleges and universities for current and former enlisted service members who want to pursue higher education. These boot camps are offered at no cost to the student-veteran participant. During the boot camp, highly successful student-veterans who have transitioned from the military to college guide WSP participants alongside dedicated university tenured faculty.The participants are introduced to analytic reading, writing, and other academic and everyday skills crucial to success in higher education in both liberal arts and STEM tracks. Importantly, they also learn about the many challenges that are experienced by student-veterans during their transition from military service to college, including the complex university application and admissions processes.

For more information on the Warrior-Scholar Project, please visit www.warrior-scholar.org.